Issue Briefs

The Issue Briefs listed below are taken directly from the 2018 Menus of Change Annual Report so they are easier for you to study and share. Share these issues on Twitter using the buttons below, to help spread the information from the report to your followers.

These briefs synthesize the latest health and environmental data to provide a clear picture of the industry’s challenges and opportunities, as well as practical next steps for foodservice operations. The report also assigns each issue a score that rates the industry’s efforts in these critical areas.

METHODOLOGY

The scores were developed based on the expert opinions of the Menus of Change Scientific and Technical Advisory Council, who considered new research findings and trend data as well as innovations and change in business practices and policies, and were reviewed by members of the Menus of Change Sustainable Business Leadership Council to ensure they reflected new industry initiatives and practices.

The key for the scores is in the sidebar at right. To read the full brief, simply click on the title. To download a PDF of any of them, click on the link at the top of each article. The copyright for all Issue Briefs is the following:

© 2018 The Culinary Institute of America and President and Fellows of Harvard College

CLIMATE CHANGE

Fri, November 02, 2018
Climate change and water scarcity are among the greatest threats to the U.S. foodservice industry and the nation’s food system overall.
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WATER SUSTAINABILITY

Fri, November 02, 2018
​This past year, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization called global attention to the link between sustainable management of water resources, food production, and the food industry.
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FISH, SEAFOOD, AND OCEANS

Fri, November 02, 2018
Seafood is a nutritious and environmentally efficient protein that can complement almost any operation’s sustainability platform. Americans eat most of their seafood away from home
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FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CONSUMPTION AND PRODUCTION

Fri, November 02, 2018
Most people recognize compelling reasons why fruits and vegetables would, could, and simply should become a larger part of the American plate. Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption is great for... read more
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PROTEIN CONSUMPTION AND PRODUCTION

Fri, November 02, 2018
The average American adult man consumes 75 percent more protein than is recommended; for American women, it’s 50 percent more.
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PORTION SIZE AND CALORIC INTAKE

Fri, November 02, 2018
Culinary professionals have an unprecedented opportunity to help end the epidemics of obesity and related diseases.
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DIET QUALITY AND HEALTH

Fri, November 02, 2018
Dietary quality is an important determinant of weight gain and obesity, and a vast body of evidence shows that diet quality directly affects the risk of almost all important diseases independent of its effect on body weight.
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AGRICULTURE, DRUGS, CHEMICALS USE, AND ANIMAL WELFARE

Fri, November 02, 2018
The rapid rise of diseases and infections that are resistant to antibiotics is one of the three slow-motion disasters threatening global public health.
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LAND USE AND FARMING PRACTICES

Fri, November 02, 2018
We have enough fertile farmland and range lands to produce the food needed to provide a healthy diet for all Americans. A recent report showed current U.S. rangeland and farmland can support the dietary needs of 130 percent to 261 percent of the current U.S. population.
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LOCAL AND REGIONAL FOOD SYSTEMS

Thu, November 01, 2018
Chefs sourcing ingredients for their restaurants from within local and regional food systems began in earnest with the New American cuisine movement of the late 1970s and early ’80s, led by pioneers such as Alice Waters, Jeremiah Tower, and Cindy Pawlcyn.
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CHANGES IN FOOD INDUSTRY INVESTOR STANDARDS

Thu, November 01, 2018
The past year brought a wave of unprecedented changes and challenges to the U.S. food and agriculture sectors, and these effects translated to new approaches to investment in food and beverages.
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SUPPLY CHAIN RESILIENCY AND TRANSPARENCY

Thu, November 01, 2018
We saw many advances in food traceability and safety, but also reminders that continued improvement and attention is very much warranted, as our food supply remains vulnerable to disease outbreaks and food fraud.
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